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I would like your input on cooking on a spit over wood fire.

How would you prepair meat? rub with oil? Inject spices? Also about temp ?Hot and fast to seer or slow indirect heat. The type of meat is usually from Sams club in 15Lb. chunk would appereciate suggestions thanks guys. Wade Hoagland Happy cows make good BBQ.
Answer: 
This is a great question. Cooking over a split fire is a great means for cooking BBQ. You will find that the wood will bring out great flavor in your brisket. Hope this helps. Paul Schatte

Paul, I have been a VERY loyal Head Country customer for over ten years now.

I fire up my smoker several times a year and usually smoke a brisket, a few racks of spare ribs and some kielbasa. I have been using hickory for the smoke since my father taught me the "art" 30 years ago. However I would like to venture out and try some other "flavors". What other woods would work with all of these meats in the same smoker and if you could, please explain the differences in the flavors the different woods would produce. Thanks and keep up the good work!
Answer: 
Patrick, Thank you for your loyalty. I like to layer flavors on meats I smoke. Different types of wood do provide different flavors. Regardless of the type of wood, make sure they are always dry or aged for 6-8 months. It is the moisture in the wood that will put a creasote flavor (bitter taste) to the meat. I mainly use pecan wood for smoking, it is mild and allows the Head Country seasoning and bbq sauce to be tasted also. I use this on all cuts of meat. I have used other wood and had good sucess. Pork tastes good with an Apple wood smoke. Chicken is very good with Cherry wood. I have never been a fan of Mesquite wood. It never seems to lose enough moisture to get rid of the bitter taste the smoke leaves behind. I do like a mixture of Pecan/Hickory on beef, especially brisket. I hope this helps. Let me know if you have other questions. Paul

we have a competition team and i havent been doing well in chicken

i want to ask your recommendation on making my chicken skin tender and also having a deep dark color? i have tried steam, and then back to the grill but my skin is still tough! help!

Answer: 
Monte,, thanks for the question. Sometimes it is the age of the bird. Try this: place the seasoned pieces in a pan skinside up. Place a 1/4" pad of butter on the skin side. Every 20 minutes turn the piece over, until it reaches 175-180 degrees internal. Try to cook as fast as possible (1 Hour). You may also brine the pieces before cooking. I baste with bbq sauce. That helps the softness of the skin also. I hope this helps. Paul

I would like your input on cooking on a spit over wood fire

how would you prepair meat? rub with oil? Inject spices? Also about temp ?Hot and fast to seer or slow indirect heat. The type of meat is usually from Sams club in 15Lb. chunk would appereciate suggestions thanks guys. Wade Hoagland Happy cows make good BBQ.

Answer: 
Wade, cooking over a spit is generally more for show then anything. it does make a good show. I would rub with my Head Country All-Purpose Championship Seasoning and then marinade in my Premium Marinade for 1 hour. Save the marinade and laddle over the top of the chunks of meat while cooking. If there is a way to determine the temperature I would cook at 275 for the first 4 hours. Then boost the temp to 300 degrees for the remaining time. Cook until the internal temp gets to 195-200 degrees. This may take 9-10 hours. You can spray apple juice or beef broth over the meat while cooking to keep it moist. I hope this helps. Let me know if you have other questions. Paul

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